Horsham 3     Hastings 3

HELP Results Form October 18
Date of Match Division / Competition 2
21-Nov
Home Team Away Team
Horsham 3 Hastings 3
 Â
Grade Player Player Grade
1 165 Harbott, Peter  1/2  1/2 Wheeler, James M 159
2 164 Taylor, Alex B 0 1 Bryant, Marc A 136
3 163 Heath, Chris W  1/2  1/2 Hann, Chris N #N/A
4 160 Comley, Ian S 1 0 Woodhams, Mason 136
5 157 Bennet-Stevens, Lucy 1 0 Willson, Gary 129
3 2
Board Name Home Away Estimated Grade Comments
3 Hann, Chris N Away 136 ECF Ref: 112034H

Division 2 Results

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 plyd MP GP DP
1 Hastings & St Leonards 2  xxx 4.5 4 2 2 8.5 0
2 Horsham 2  xxx 2.5 4.5 2 1.5 7 0
3 Crowborough  xxx 2 3.5 2 1 5.5 0
4 Woodpushers 1  xxx 4.5 1 1 4.5 0
5 Hastings & St Leonards 3 0.5 3  xxx  2 1 5.5 0
6 Horsham 3 1 2.5  3  xxx  3 1.5 6.5 0
7 Uckfield 1 0.5  xxx 2.5 2 0.5 3 0
8 Eastbourne 2 2.5  xxx 1 0.5 2.5 0
9 Lewes 2 1.5 0.5 xxx 2 0 2 0

Victor Pelton

by Brian Denman & Marc Bryant

Victor Pelton was born as Verdi Pelton, but was known as Victor or joe. His place of birth was Rathmines, Dublin, on 27.11.1874. His profession was an estate agent and he died in Hastings on 21.8.1955. age 80

In the early 1950s the club was having difficulty in deciding whether to stay at 7 Carlisle Parade. Mr Pelton donated £1,000 at both the 1951 and 1952 AGMs to provide money for the freehold of new premises.

In the end the club decided on 31.1.1953 to leave Carlisle Parade.

Mr Pelton’s full donation eventually came to £3,000 in today money (2017) this would be nearly £90000 pounds and 2 Cornwallis Terrace was bought for £2,100 leaving money, which could be used for re-decoration

the official re opening of the club was on the 22 may 1954 unfortunately Mr Pelton
was unable to a tended

. Pelton was appointed as an honorary life-president of the club, but he did not live for very long after this. The new premises were administered by Pelton House Ltd until 2014.
Brian

Frank Arthur Rhoden

by Brian Denman & Marc Bryant

Frank Arthur Rhoden died on 2nd July 1981 in hospital after a
short final illness

Frank was born in Lee, South East; London, on 24th July 1906 and learned to play
chess at an early age. While never in the top flight he became nonetheless a
strong player delighting in the more romantic openings.

Before 1939, apart from playing for the Bohemians in the London League, he helped to found clubs in Manor House and at Marconi Limited (where he worked). He served in the
R.A.F. during the Second World War and after that qualified as a teacher. His work brought him to Hastings, which he loves wholeheartedly as he soaked himself in its wonderful chess
History

The first record that I can find of him being a member of the club is in 1948. In his early years he became club librarian and a team captain and was quite successful in his games over the board. He sometimes tried unusual openings and you will see that in the game against Finch played in 1959 he answered the Ruy Lopez with 3…g5.

In 1953/54 he became both chess columnist for the Hastings and St Leonards Observer and congress director – in both cases he took over from A A Rider.

The Christmas Congress at the time was in some danger and he quickly breathe new life into it restored its prestige as nearly all the strongest players of the world took part in the Premier tournament during his fifteen-year tenure of office. It had been several years since a Russian star had played in the Premier and in the 1953-54 Congress he brought a lot of interest to the town by managing to persuade both Bronstein and Tolush to compete. Rhoden obviously was very good at making them feel welcome and the Russian party of four were invited to watch Hastings United’s FA Cup tie against Norwich.

The arrival of the grandmasters was not, however, without controversy. Rhoden had invited a Spanish master, Roman Bordell to play in the Premier, but the Russians declared that they would not compete if there were ‘Fascist’ entrants. At this Rhoden cancelled Bordell’s invitation and the Spanish Chess Federation broke off relations with their British counterpart!

It is a pity that the great Bobby Fischer never played in a Hastings Congress. In 1956 when Fischer was 13 Rhoden sent an invitation to America. At first the Americans did not have sufficient funds to send him to Britain. Then by the time the money was available Rhoden had filled all 10 places in the Premier. This did not go down well in New York and the New York Times produced a headline: “Youth Denied Place in Chess.” In 1957 Rhoden again invited Fischer to play in the Premier and this time Fischer accepted. However, later he changed his mind and told Rhoden that he preferred to play in the Rosenwald Tournament. In the Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 16.11.1957 Rhoden wrote: “When I think of the letters I’ve written, the telephone calls I’ve made, and the precious time I’ve wasted over this boy, I feel that a hearty smack where his jeans fit tightest wouldn’t come amiss!

When he took over the chess column, Frank brought renewed interest in the game and he had a pleasant English style. He was particularly good at producing pen pictures of club members and he understood their human strengths and weaknesses in a touching way. He was only occasionally controversial and was quite unlike Edward Ackroyd, who wrote the column in the early 1920s. Rhoden wrote about this predecessor of his in the Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 27.6.1981 describing him as ‘a minor master of invective and abuse’. Some of Rhoden’s articles stand out and I should like to mention here his account of the Hastings CC tour of Europe in 1903 (Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 15.8.1953), his article about
, the 1895 Hastings International Tournament (Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 5.1.1974) and the descriptions of the club visits to Wormwood Scrubs and Maidstone Prison (Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 8.10.1966 and 16.12.1972 respectively). He was very loyal to the club, though there was little information about the rest of Sussex in his articles.

In the Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 14.1.1956 Rhoden stated that for a long time he had been considering writing a history of the club. He would, however, hate to turn out a lifeless official history and added that he could not write this fascinating story from club minutes as they contain ‘only the skeleton of the club’s body’.

Finally, Brian would like to mention a chess article in the Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 18.4.1981. It is reported there that the club had its youngest ever match captain, 20-year-old Marc Bryant, under whose guidance the club had played 23 matches with 17 wins, 3 draws and 3 losses.
Hastings Observer was, for nearly 30 years, one of the best in the country.
Frank was a great communicator. he wrote about the game, broadcast number of
talks on the BBC radio chess programme of the 1960’s and had a great fund of stories.

Everything he did was in his own inimitable style (we recall his cabling direct to Khrushchev in 1953 when sending invitations to Soviet players companied by a remark that you
didn’t address the monkey when the organ-grinder was available!

In 1967/68 Rhoden was unhappy that 30 out of 45 games were drawn and considered resigning as Director. He ran one more congress, but felt that he had lost his freshness as organiser. Laurie Glyde took over Frank’s post after that

He had a stroke in June 1980, but carried on writing articles for about a year after that

The Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 27.12.1984 stated that playing a game with Frank Rhoden was a nerve-racking experience, for he simply could not bring himself to sit still at the table for more than five minutes together. He may not, however, have been like this in his early days at the club.

British chess has once again been diminished by the loss of one of its
‘characters:

Chess, and Hastings in particular, owes Frank Rhoden a debt.
¬ (The character of the man comes a through in the last long
articles he wrote which appeared in the BCM 1981 June page 198

Hastings & St Leonards 2   Maidstone 2

 

Hastings & St Leonards 2 v Maidstone 2

MID Stevenson Cup 2017-11-19

Board Home Hastings & St Leonards 2 Maidstone 2 Away
1 (B) 170A (170)
G

Kelly, Paul J

0 – 1
G

Chandler, Cliff R

204A (204)
2 (W) 161A (161)
G

Ruane, Brendan J

1 – 0
B

Lane, Robert E

149A (149)
3 (B) 159A (159)
S

Wheeler, James M

½ – ½
G

Heath, David R

144A (144)
4 (W) 136A (136)
S

Woodhams, Mason

½ – ½
B

Smith, Douglas J

121B (121)
5 (B) 132A (132)
G

Cload, Adrian

0 – 1
G

Dirmauskas, Peter

118A (118)
6 (W) 119A (119)
G

Stock, William

1 – 0
N

Cox, Robert

73B (73)
Average 146 3 – 3 Average 134

 

Team Play Won Draw Lost For Against Points SP MP IM
Hastings & St Leonards 2 4 1 2 1 11½ 12½ 4 0 0 0
Maidstone 2 2 1 1 0 3 0 0 0
Tunbridge Wells 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0
Rainham (Kent) 2 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 0
Rochester 1 3 0 1 2 7 11 1 0 0 0

Folkestone 1   Hastings & St Leonards 1

 

 

Team Play Won Draw Lost For Against Points SP MP IM
Tunbridge Wells 1 3 3 0 0 14 4 6 0 0 0
Hastings & St Leonards 1 3 2 0 1 10 8 4 0 0 0
Rainham (Kent) 1 3 1 1 1 10½ 3 0 0 0
Folkestone 1 3 0 1 2 7 11 1 0 0 0
Maidstone 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0

 

 

MID County / Lewis Cup 2017-11-18

Board Home Folkestone 1 Hastings & St Leonards 1 Away
1 (B) 178C
B

Bayford, Jim R

½ – ½
G

Sugden, John N

190A
2 (W) 176A
G

Cutmore, Martin J

½ – ½
N

Varley, Nicolas

188L ()
3 (B) 169B
B

Shire, David J

0 – 1
G

Kelly, Paul J

170A
4 (W) 163C
S

Smyth, Kevin

½ – ½
G

Cove, Henry

170A
5 (B) 163B
S

Atherton, John B

0 – 1
S

Wheeler, James M

159A
6 (W) 155D (155)
B

Demirbilek, Tayfun

1 – 0
S

Webb, Roy E

112C
Average 167 2½ – 3½ Average 164

Wilfred Hugh. Miller. KIRK

Wilfred Hugh. Miller. KIRK

by Marc A Bryant And Brian Denman

.
Wilfred was born at Culmstock in Mid-Devon in 1877. and at an early age he went to America. On his
return he·came to London and entered the. Civil Service being engaged at the Ministry Of health.

“He was for a great number of years Hon.secretary of the Civil Service Chess Club and did valuable service. He competed at the first congress of the British Chess fedcration at Hastings in 1904, and was third with 7.5 in the second-class tournament,
on his next effort at Richmond in 1912 he headed one of the first-class sections with 9.5 out of II
The following year, at Cheltenham, he was placed about half- way in the maìor, open contest. His best B.C.F. performance was at Hastings Victory Congress
of 1919, when he finished first in a first-class section with 9.5 above Fred Brown 8, J. Stephenson 7.5 and Max Euwe (Holland) 7. Euwe was then beginning his chess career he played in the British Championship at Ramsgate in 1929, but struggled scoring two points out of eleven.
Mr. Kirk had been in Hastings some seven or eight years, and stayed here throughout the war engaged in civil defence work
He reti red from the Civ i I Service in 1937 and spent the best part of a year abroad,
living in Mentone for six months and going on into Switzerland, Austria and Germany.
during this period, he met a number of Continental celebrities, and it was considered
an event when he was beaten.
He came to Hastings in 1938 and played on a high board for the club. he became Assistant Secretary and Treasurer to the club, and organized the first International Congress following the war, which was such a conspicuous success. The club had hoped that it had found a worthy successor to Mr.A.F. Kidney in the organization of Christmas congresses, but it as not to be.
“Besides his great interest in chess, Mr. Kirk was fond of music and was keenly Interested in cricket, and was also a good lawn tennis player. During his residence
in St. Leonards, he had also taken a deep interest in the welfare of the home for blind
people at Quarry Hill.”
He died at Hastings on 12.6.1946 The loss of W. H.M Kirk is a loss to British chess, how great a
loss will be particularly appreciated by those who attended the: Congress in 1946 at Hastings.
He was one of the prime movers and carried out his important dutes with the utmost efficiency, and unvarying courtesy.
Event “Kent Congress 1st Class Open “]
[Date “1906.04.??”]
[White “Kirk, WHM.”]
[Black “Chapman, C.”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 d6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb6 7. O-O Bg4 8.
Be3 Nf6 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Qd2 Qe8 11. Ng5 h6 12. f3 hxg5 13. fxg4 Nxe4 14. Qd3
Nxc3 15. bxc3 Qd7 16. h3 Rae8 17. Rf5 Ne7 18. Rxg5 d5 19. Rh5 g6 20. Bg5 dxc4
21. Bf6 gxh5 22. Qe3 Qe6 23. Qh6 Qxf6 24. Qxf6 hxg4 25. h4 Ng6 26. h5 Re6 27.
Qg5 Kh7 28. hxg6+ Rxg6 29. Qd5 Rd6 30. Qh5+ Kg7 31. Qxg4+ Rg6 32. Qf5 Re8 33.
Rf1 Re7 34. Qd5 Rg3 35. Rxf7+ Rxf7 36. Qe5+ Kf8 37. Qxg3 {‘and eventually wins.
5.5.1906. The congress took place at Tunbridge Wells.} 1-0

[Event “Civil Service and Municipal League bd 1”]
[Date “1909
white “Nettleton, F.”]
[Black “Kirk, WHM.”]
1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. f4 cxd4 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Nc3 Qa5 8. Qd2
Nh6 9. Nf3 Bd7 10. Bd3 Rc8 11. O-O Nxd4 12. Nxd4 Rxc3 13. Qe2 Rxc1 14. Raxc1
Qb6 15. Qf2 Ng4 16. Qg3 Qxd4+ 17. Kh1 h5 18. h3 Bc5 19. Be2 Qe3 20. Qxe3 Bxe3
21. Rc7 Nf2+ 22. Kh2 Bxf4+ 23. g3 Bxe5 24. Rxb7 Ne4 25. Rf3 Nxg3 26. Rxg3 h4 {
The article does not tell us which teams the players were representing or where the match was played.} 0-1

[Event “Civil Service Municipal Lge v Hampstead”]
[Date “1909.10.06”]
[White “Kirk, WHM.”]
[Black “White, JH.”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. O-O d6 6. c3 Nf6 7. cxd4 Bb6 8. e5
dxe5 9. d5 e4 10. Ng5 Ne5 11. Nc3 O-O 12. Bb3 Bf5 13. Bc2 Bg4 14. Qd2 e3 15.
fxe3 h6 16. Nge4 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 f5 18. Nf2 Qg5 19. Qc3 Bf3 20. g3 Rae8 21. Nh3
Qg4 22. Nf4 g5 23. Ne6 Bxd5 24. Qxe5 Bxe6 25. Bd3 Bxa2 26. Bxf5 Qe2 27. Qc3
Rxe3 {Source: The Field of 23.10.1909. Played on board 4 in the match at the
Mecca Cafe, 56 Ludgate Hill, London.} 0-1

[Event “Surrey Championship finals”]
[Date “1912.
[White “Kirk, WHM.”]
[Black “Steadman, Dr F St J”]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4 5. e5 h6 6. Bd2 Bxc3 7. Bxc3 Ne4 8. Bd3
Nxc3 9. bxc3 c5 10. Qg4 O-O 11. Qf4 c4 12. Be2 Nc6 13. Nf3 b5 14. a3 Bd7 15.
O-O Qe7 16. Qe3 Rab8 17. h3 Rb6 18. Nh2 Ra6 19. Qc1 f6 20. f4 f5 21. Nf3 Kh7
22. g4 g6 23. g5 h5 24. Nh4 Rb8 25. Rf2 Be8 26. Rg2 Ra4 27. Bxh5 gxh5 28. g6+
Kg7 29. Rg5 Qf8 30. Qd1 Ne7 31. Qxh5 Qh8 32. Kh2 b4 33. Rag1 bxa3 34. Qh7+ Qxh7
35. gxh7+ Kxh7 36. Rg7+ Kh8 37. Rxe7 a2 38. Rxe6 Rb7 39. Rxe8+ Kh7 40. Rgg8
a1=Q 41. Rh8+ Kg7 42. Nxf5+ Kg6 43. Nh4+ Kg7 44. Ref8 {
1-0

[Date “1912.09.??”]

[White “Goulding Brown, B.”]
[Black “Kirk, WHM.”]
1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. h4 g4 5. Ng5 h6 6. Nxf7 Kxf7 7. d4 d5 8. Bxf4
Nf6 9. Nc3 Bg7 10. Be2 h5 11. O-O dxe4 12. Bg5 Kg6 13. Nxe4 Bf5 14. Ng3 Be6 15.
c3 c5 16. Qc2+ Kf7 17. dxc5 Qd5 18. Ne4 Nbd7 19. Rad1 Qe5 20. Rxd7+ Bxd7 21.
Nxf6 Bxf6 22. Bxf6 Qxf6 23. Bc4+ Kg7 24. Rxf6 Kxf6 25. Qf2+ Ke7 26. Qf7+ Kd8
27. Qf6+ Kc7 28. Qe5+ Kc6 29. Qd6# 1-0

[Event “Middlesex v Surrey in London board 8”]

[Date “1913.05.24”]
White “Scott, RHV.”]
[Black “Kirk, WHM.”]1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. Bxe7 Qxe7 7. Nb5 Qd8 8.
c3 a6 9. Na3 c5 10. f4 Nc6 11. Nf3 Qb6 12. Qd2 cxd4 13. Nxd4 Nc5 14. Nxc6 bxc6
15. Bd3 Nxd3+ 16. Qxd3 Qxb2 17. Nc2 a5 18. Kd2 Ba6 19. Qe3 Qb7 20. Rab1 Qc7 21.
Qc5 Kd7 22. Rb6 Rhb8 23. Rhb1 Rxb6 24. Rxb6 Bc4 25. Nd4 Ra6 26. Rb2 Ke8 27. Kc1
Bd3 28. a4 g5 29. g3 h6 30. h4 g4 31. Kd2 Bc4 32. Kc1 Bd3 33. Kd2 Bc4 34. Rb1
h5 35. Ke3 Ba2 36. Nb5 Qd7 37. Nd6+ Kf8 38. Rb7

[Event “BCF Congress, Cheltenham, Major Open”]

[Date “1913.08.21”]
White “Kirk, WHM.”]
[Black “Shories, G.”]
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. Nc3 Nf6 5. d3 d6 6. O-O Bg4 7. Be3 Bb6 8. Ne2
Bxf3 9. gxf3 Nh5 10. f4 Qh4 11. Bxb6 axb6 12. f5 g6 13. Ng3 Nf4 14. Kh1 Rg8 15.
c3 gxf5 16. exf5 d5 17. Bb5 O-O-O 18. Bxc6 bxc6 19. a4 Qh3 20. Rg1 Rg4 21. a5
Qxh2+ 22. Kxh2 Rh4#

[Event “Hastings Victory Congress 1st class ‘C'”]
[Date “1919.08.13”]

[White “O’Hanlon, JJ.”]
[Black “Kirk, WHM.”]
1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. e3 Be7 6. Nf3 O-O 7. Qc2 c6 8. Bd3
dxc4 9. Bxc4 Nd5 10. Bxe7 Qxe7 11. O-O h6 12. e4 Nf4 13. Qd2 e5 14. Bb3 Qf6 15.
Rad1 Qg6 16. g3 Qg4 17. Nxe5 Nh3+ 18. Kg2 Nxe5 19. dxe5 Ng5 20. f4 Nh7 21. f5
Qg5 22. Qxg5 Nxg5 23. h4 Nh7 24. e6 fxe6 25. fxe6 Re8 26. e7+ Kh8 27. Rd8 Bg4
28. Rxa8 Rxa8 29. Bf7 Bd7 30. Rd1 Nf6 31. e5 Nd5 32. Nxd5 cxd5 33. Bxd5 Re8 34.
e6 Bb5 35. Be4 Rxe7 36. Rd8+ Re8 37. Rxe8+ Bxe8 38. Bxb7

[Event “City of London CC Championship”]

[Date “1920.??.??”]
[White “Michell, RP.”]
[Black “Kirk, WHM.”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 d6 7. Ng5 d5 8. exd5
Nd4 9. Nc3 h6 10. Nf3 Nxb3 11. axb3 b4 12. Re1 bxc3 13. Nxe5 Qxd5 14. Ng6+ Be6
15. Nxh8 O-O-O 16. Qe2 Rd6 17. bxc3 Bg4 18. f3 Re6 19. Qf2 Bh5 20. Rxe6 Qxe6
21. Qf1 Kb7 22. g4 Nxg4 23. fxg4 Bxg4 24. d4 Bf5 25. Nxf7 {

[Event “City of London CC Championship “]
[Date “1920.01.27”]
white “Kirk, WHM.”]
[Black “Thomas, Sir George”]
1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Bc5 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d3 d6 5. Bg5 c6 6. Na4 Bb4+ 7. c3 Ba5 8. b4
Bc7 9. Nb2 Nbd7 10. Ne2 Nf8 11. Ng3 h6 12. Bd2 Ng6 13. Nh5 O-O 14. Qf3 Nxh5 15.
Qxh5 Kh7 16. h4 Qd7 17. d4 d5 18. exd5 cxd5 19. Bd3 e4 20. Bc2 b6 21. Nd1 f5
22. Bb3 Ba6 23. Nb2 Bf4 24. Qd1 Qd6 25. h5 Bxd2+ 26. Qxd2 Nf4 27. O-O-O Rac8
28. Kb1 Rc7 29. Rde1 Rfc8 30. Re3 Bd3+ 31. Nxd3 Nxd3 32. Rxd3 exd3 33. Qxd3
Rxc3 34. Qxf5+ Kh8 35. Rh3 Rc1+ 36. Kb2 Qxb4 {

Arthur Albert Rider

Arthur Albert Rider
16th November 2017 Marc BryantEdit
Arthur Albert Rider
A A Rider. was born in Kennington in 1881. In 1914 he married Florence Ann Jenkins in Lambeth. His wife died on 28.2.1953 and he himself passed away on 24.1.1954. at the age of seventy-two
one of the early censuses lists him as a solicitor’s clerk. he came to Hastings to retire and in 1934 ran his first Boy’s Congress. In 1935 he became joint Assistant Secretary of the club with Miss Lewcock and in 1937 became joint Secretary with A F Kidney. In 1938 Kidney became president and Rider ran the secretary’s job on his own.
The Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 30.10.1937 gives a good example of his interest in junior chess. It reported that during a few weeks of vacation he toured schools in order to get the boys interested in the Boy’s Congress and travelled as far as the Midlands for this.also British Girls’ Championship received his devoted attention in the formation of a girls’ competition, though this did not come to pass until 1953 not long before he died.
During the War he was a tower of strength. As many other clubs closed, Rider was determined to keep the Hastings club open even though it suffered bomb damage. A number of friendly games were played with Brighton during this period. Rider worked at the Army Records Office at Ore in this period and he played chess for Ore Place and the Baptist Church in Wellington Square.He was a religious person and was Superintendent of Sunday School for a while. Presumably this was at the Wellington Square church, but was also a member of the independent Baptist Church in London called Spurgeons for thirty years.
In 1946 an anonymous member of the club presented the Rider Shield to the club for the Sussex schoolboy who got the highest score in the British Boys’ Championship. the shield still hangs in the club.
After the war Rider played a significant role in the restarting of the Hastings Congresses acting as one of the Controllers and later as Congress Director,
He also had to make plans for a new premises for the club as the lease on the Carlisle Parade began to run out. He was chess columnist of the Hastings and St Leonards Observer newspaper from 1949 to 1953. In 1952 the International Chess Federation awarded him the honour of being appointed as an international judge following the work that he did for the Christmas Congresses.
His platform on such occasions will be sadly miss his familiar and genial presence, with a pipe in his mouth, a twinkle in his eye, and the ever-ready smile to brighten the proceedings.
To Arthur Rider chess was a life interest.Though not a very strong player, he liked playing the game:but in a real sense he preferred to live the game.
After a.great deal of travelling in his younger days, he settled down in Hastings He had held office in the club,since 1934
In.August 1953 he became seriously ill.At the Annual General Meeting,in 1953 he tendered his resignation,on account of ill-health the club refused to accept his resignation ,
Far too often he had been heard to say that he dreaded the day when he would be unable to visit the club For the first time in 1953 he missed the Christmas Congress but his condition worsened despite visits to the hospital and nursing home. it was his wish to return home there he passed away on Sunday, January 24th.
The funeral service was held at Wellington Square Baptist Church. The minister, the Rev. F. V. Mildred, paid tribute to Mr.Rider’s faithful membership,to his many Christian qualities,and to his
long and devoted work as superintendent of the Sunday School. . . ,
A few days before his death permission was granted for the British Boys Congresses to be moved away from Hastings. He was very ill at the time, but it is unlikely that this would have been something he would have approved of after all his work in promoting the junior congresses in the town .
ln the international chess arena,as in much else,the Iimelight is thrown on the performers. They take the stage: they enrich life with their skill.
Too often,little is known of the personalities behind the scenes who make all this possible:of their
capacity for unremitting and self-sacrificing work, of their gifts for organization,of their powers “to see things whole” combined with great attention to details,of the wisdom and diplomacy which remove friction and set the wheels running smoothly.
Amongst such!A.A.Rider was a notable example.These will long keep his memory green, and will inspire those who take up where he left off..
By
Marc A Bryant and Brian Denman
Uncategorised

Arthur Albert Rider

Arthur Albert Rider

A A Rider. was born in Kennington in 1881. In 1914 he married Florence Ann Jenkins in Lambeth. His wife died on 28.2.1953 and he himself passed away on 24.1.1954. at the age of seventy-two
one of the early censuses lists him as a solicitor’s clerk. he came to Hastings to retire and in 1934 ran his first Boy’s Congress. In 1935 he became joint Assistant Secretary of the club with Miss Lewcock and in 1937 became joint Secretary with A F Kidney. In 1938 Kidney became president and Rider ran the secretary’s job on his own.
The Hastings and St Leonards Observer of 30.10.1937 gives a good example of his interest in junior chess. It reported that during a few weeks of vacation he toured schools in order to get the boys interested in the Boy’s Congress and travelled as far as the Midlands for this.also British Girls’ Championship received his devoted attention in the formation of a girls’ competition, though this did not come to pass until 1953 not long before he died.
During the War he was a tower of strength. As many other clubs closed, Rider was determined to keep the Hastings club open even though it suffered bomb damage. A number of friendly games were played with Brighton during this period. Rider worked at the Army Records Office at Ore in this period and he played chess for Ore Place and the Baptist Church in Wellington Square.He was a religious person and was Superintendent of Sunday School for a while. Presumably this was at the Wellington Square church, but was also a member of the independent Baptist Church in London called Spurgeons for thirty years.
In 1946 an anonymous member of the club presented the Rider Shield to the club for the Sussex schoolboy who got the highest score in the British Boys’ Championship. the shield still hangs in the club.
After the war Rider played a significant role in the restarting of the Hastings Congresses acting as one of the Controllers and later as Congress Director,
He also had to make plans for a new premises for the club as the lease on the Carlisle Parade began to run out. He was chess columnist of the Hastings and St Leonards Observer newspaper from 1949 to 1953. In 1952 the International Chess Federation awarded him the honour of being appointed as an international judge following the work that he did for the Christmas Congresses.
His platform on such occasions will be sadly miss his familiar and genial presence, with a pipe in his mouth, a twinkle in his eye, and the ever-ready smile to brighten the proceedings.
To Arthur Rider chess was a life interest.Though not a very strong player, he liked playing the game:but in a real sense he preferred to live the game.
After a.great deal of travelling in his younger days, he settled down in Hastings He had held office in the club,since 1934
In.August 1953 he became seriously ill.At the Annual General Meeting,in 1953 he tendered his resignation,on account of ill-health the club refused to accept his resignation ,
Far too often he had been heard to say that he dreaded the day when he would be unable to visit the club For the first time in 1953 he missed the Christmas Congress but his condition worsened despite visits to the hospital and nursing home. it was his wish to return home there he passed away on Sunday, January 24th.
The funeral service was held at Wellington Square Baptist Church. The minister, the Rev. F. V. Mildred, paid tribute to Mr.Rider’s faithful membership,to his many Christian qualities,and to his
long and devoted work as superintendent of the Sunday School. . . ,
A few days before his death permission was granted for the British Boys Congresses to be moved away from Hastings. He was very ill at the time, but it is unlikely that this would have been something he would have approved of after all his work in promoting the junior congresses in the town .
ln the international chess arena,as in much else,the Iimelight is thrown on the performers. They take the stage: they enrich life with their skill.
Too often,little is known of the personalities behind the scenes who make all this possible:of their
capacity for unremitting and self-sacrificing work, of their gifts for organization,of their powers “to see things whole” combined with great attention to details,of the wisdom and diplomacy which remove friction and set the wheels running smoothly.
Amongst such!A.A.Rider was a notable example.These will long keep his memory green, and will inspire those who take up where he left off..
By
Marc A Bryant and Brian Denman

Hastings 2     Horsham 3

Date of Match Division / Competition 2
14-Nov
Home Team Away Team
Hastings 2 Horsham 3
 Â
Grade Player Player Grade
1 181 Cafferty, Bernard  1/2  1/2 Stimpson, Philip M 168
2 #N/A N.Varley 1 0 Harbott, Peter 165
3 170 Kelly, Paul J 1 0 Taylor, A 164
4 170 Cove, Henry 1 0 Comley, Ian S 160
5 161 Blewitt, Stephen D 0.5  1/2 Richardson, Paul 151
4
Board Name Home Away Estimated Grade Comments
Div2_Hastings_2_vs_Horsham_3
Division 2 Results
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 plyd MP GP DP
1 Hastings & St Leonards 2 4.5 4 2 2 8.5 0
2 Crowborough 2 3.5 2 1 5.5 0
3 Hastings & St Leonards 3 0.5 3 2 1 3.5 0
4 Eastbourne 2 2.5 1 0.5 2.5 0
5 Horsham 2 0 0.5 2.5 0
6 Uckfield 1 2.5 1 0.5 2.5 0
7 Lewes 2 1.5 1 0 1.5 0
8 Woodpushers 1 0 0 0 0
9 horsham3 1 2.5 2 0.5 3.5
HELP Results Form October 18
Date of Match Division / Competition 2
14-Nov
Home Team Away Team
Hastings 2

Rochester 1   Hastings & St Leonards 2

Board Home Rochester 1 Hastings & St Leonards 2 Away
1 (B) 166A
P

Hyde, Keith G

0 – 1
G

Kelly, Paul J

170A
2 (W) 157A
B

Nevols, Keith

1 – 0
G

Cove, Henry

170A
3 (B) 136F
N

Tsatsarov, Martin

½ – ½
S

Wheeler, James M

159A
4 (W) 130L
N

Gedminas, Vytautas

1 – 0
S

Bryant, Marc A

136A
5 (B) 122F
B

Page, David A

0 – 1
S

Woodhams, Mason

136A
6 (W) 120A
B

Pol, Jerry

½ – ½
S

Cosens, Derek

129A
Average 138 3 – 3 Average 150

Hastings & St Leonards 2 3 1 1 1 3 0 0 0
Tunbridge Wells 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0
Maidstone 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0
Rochester 1 2 0 1 1 5 7 1 0 0 0
Rainham (Kent) 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

Est. 1882